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How to Resolve the Banking Crisis

Aug 16, 2008

http://www.webofdebt.com/articles/bracing-storm.php

Here is an excellent and informative article that gives the real solution to the current banking crisis. It points out that big bank officials have acted irresponsibly because they assume that their bank is "too big to fail," and so therefore the government will be forced to bail them out with taxpayer money.

However, the government does have the option of foreclosing on those same banks and, in effect, nationalizing them. Though the Federal Reserve is a private banking corporation, the FDIC is a government (public) institution, and it has the right to nationalize any bank that it has to bail out. This article tells us that it did this very thing with Continental Bank of Illinois not long ago.

Perhaps as the crisis deepens, it will force the re-nationalization of the banks, including the Fed, and thus end our modern Babylonian captivity.

The article reads, in part:

So what would happen if the mega-banks engaging in these irresponsible practices actually went bankrupt? These banks are widely acknowledged to be at fault, but they expect to be bailed out by the Federal Reserve or the taxpayers because they are “too big to fail.” The argument is that if they were allowed to collapse, they would take the economy down with them. That is the fear, but it is not actually true. We do need a ready source of credit, so we need banks; but we don’t need private banks. It is a little-known, well-concealed fact that banks do not lend their own money or even their depositors’ money. They actually create the money they lend; and creating money is properly a public, not a private, functionThe Constitution delegates the power to create money to Congress and only to Congress.12 In making loans, banks are merely extending credit; and the proper agency for extending “the full faith and credit of the United States” is the United States itself.

There is more at stake here than just the equitable treatment of injured homeowners and investors in mortgage-backed securities.  Banks and investment houses are now squeezing the last drops of blood from the U.S. government’s credit rating, “borrowing” money and unloading worthless paper on the government and the taxpayers.  When the dust settles, it will be the banks, investment brokerages and hedge funds for wealthy investors that will be saved.  The repossessed will become the dispossessed; and unless your pension fund has invested in politically well-connected hedge funds, you can probably kiss it goodbye, as teachers in Florida already have. 

But the banking genie is a creature of the law, and the law can put it back in the bottle. The imminent failure of some very big banks could provide the government with an opportunity to regain control of its finances.  More than that, it could provide the funds for tackling otherwise unsolvable problems now threatening to destroy our standard of living and our standing in the world.  The only solution that will be more than a temporary fix is to take the power to create money away from private bankers and return it to the people collectively.  That is how it should have been all along, and how it was in our early history; but we are so used to banks being private corporations that we have forgotten the public banks of our forebears.  The best of the colonial American banking models was developed in Benjamin Franklin’s province of Pennsylvania, where a government-owned bank issued money and lent it to farmers at 5 percent interest.  The interest was returned to the government, replacing taxes.  During the decades that that system was in operation, the province of Pennsylvania operated without taxes, inflation or debt

Rather than bailing out bankrupt banks and sending them on their merry way, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) needs to take a close look at the banks’ books and put any banks found to be insolvent into receivership.  The FDIC (unlike the Federal Reserve) is actually a federal agency, and it has the option of taking a bank’s stock in return for bailing it out, effectively nationalizing it.  This is done in Europe with bankrupt banks, and it was done in the United States with Continental Illinois, the country’s fourth largest bank, when it went bankrupt in the 1990s.

A system of truly “national” banks could issue “the full faith and credit of the United States” for public purposes, including funding infrastructure, sustainable energy development and health care.13 Publicly-issued credit could also be used to relieve the subprime crisis. Local governments could use it to buy up mortgages in default, compensating the MBS investors and freeing the real estate for public disposal. The properties could then be rented back to their occupants at reasonable rates, leaving people in their homes without the windfall of acquiring a house without paying for it. A program of lease-purchase might also be instituted. The proceeds would be applied toward repaying the credit advanced to buy the mortgages, balancing the money supply and preventing inflation.


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Dr. Stephen Jones


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