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Eliot Spitzer's Fall

Apr 02, 2008

In my opinion, not many politicians get far up the ladder unless there are some "safeguards" in place. These safeguards are otherwise known as "skeletons in the closet." A politician with no such skeletons finds himself under the proverbial "glass ceiling" and cannot rise to any real prominence.

Someone or some intelligence organization keeps records on all potential politicians, supposedly for the purpose of national security, but actually for the purpose of control--or outright blackmail. I think it explains why Ted Kennedy, for example, refuses to run for president, after the Chappaquiddick incident. According to the Wikipedia:

"The Chappaquiddick incident refers to the circumstances surrounding the 1969 death of Mary Jo Kopechne, a former staff member in Senator Robert F. Kennedy's 1968 presidential campaign. Edward Kennedy was driving a car with Kopechne as his passenger when the Senator drove off Dike Bridge into the channel between Chappaquiddick Island and Martha's Vineyard. The Senator swam to safety, but Kopechne died in the car. Kennedy pled guilty to leaving the scene of an accident and received a suspended sentence of two months in jail."

Eliot Spitzer made a lot of enemies on Wall Street, which celebrated his fall with dancing in the streets. There is no question that Spitzer was no angel, but I wonder how it was that he was allowed to "live in sin" for so long. Surely someone knew about it and would have said something.

It smells a lot like another case of someone finally going too far in opposing the money powers-that-be, and that someone finally decided to take him down. Here is an article that he wrote on February 14 about the current mortgage crisis. Was this, perhaps, the "final straw"?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/13/AR2008021302783_pf.html


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Dr. Stephen Jones


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